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September 17, 2018

Tokyo 2020 Qualifying — Weightlifting

Filed under: General,weightlifting — Tags: , , , — Michael @ 14:25

I base the following summary on my own reading of IWF’s Qualification System – Games of the XXXII Olympiad Tokyo 2020. This summary is NOT an official publication of any sanctioning body; it is my own interpretation. This summary does not address “Host Country” or “Tripartite Commission” spots.

Qualifying sub-periods

  • Period 1: Six months from November 2018 through April 2019
  • Period 2: Six months from May 2019 through October 2019
  • Period 3: Six months from November 2019 through April 2020

Athlete Required Participation

  • Participate in at least six events (at least two of these in an Olympic weight class).
  • Participate in at least one event in each six-month period above.
  • At least one event must be Gold Level, and a second must be either Gold or Silver Level.

Event Levels

  • Gold Level: IWF World Championships, IWF Junior World Championships, Continental Championships, Junior Continental Championships.
  • Silver Level: Existing IWF Events: Multi-Sport Games, Championships.
  • Bronze Level: other International competitions, Championships, Cups, etc.

Qualifying Pathways

  • Be one of the eight highest-ranked lifters to qualify for an Olympic weight class.
  • Or be the highest-ranked lifter from one of the five Continental federations.
    • Africa, Asia, Europe, Oceania, Pan America
  • See “IWF Absolute Ranking” below.

Limits

  • Maximum of one lifter per country in any weight class.
  • Maximum of four lifters per gender from any country. Except…
    • Maximum of two lifters per gender from any country that has had 10 to 19 IWF doping violations since 2008.
    • Maximum of one lifter per gender from any country that has had 20 or more IWF doping violations since 2008.
  • Each NOC chooses its team from among its qualified athletes.

Reallocation

Due to the limits above (and other possible causes, including redundant qualifications), National Olympic Committees (NOCs) of some of the “Top 8” and “Top Continental” qualifiers may not get to use all invitations. In these cases, IWF reallocates as follows:

  • Top 8 — Next-highest ranked athlete whose NOC is not yet qualified in the class.
  • Continental — Next-highest ranked athlete from that same continent whose NOC is not yet qualified in the class.

IWF Absolute Ranking

Each athlete’s final Absolute Ranking Points total, determined at the end of the qualifying period (April 30, 2020), is the sum of the following four scores:

  • the lifter’s best adjusted Robi score in each of the three time periods and…
  • the lifter’s highest adjusted Robi score that is not one of those first three.

Robi Score (and Adjusted Robi Score)

Examples

[To come later]

 

MK

 

July 17, 2018

IWF Robi Coefficients

Filed under: weightlifting — Tags: , , , , , , , , — Michael @ 16:07

The International Weightlifting Federation updated its Robi Point Calculator, but I could not find the coefficients they used for them. The formula for calculation of Robi Points is as follows:

Robi Points = A x Totalb
Where A = constant of the bodyweight category
and b = constant of the progressivity
Factors defining “progressivity”:
Max. Points for the World Record = 1000
WR = 50%
Points = 10%
(50% of the WR gets 10% of the max 1000 Points)1

By back-calculation, the A and b coefficients for the new (2018) IWF weight classes are as follows:

b = 3.3219281 (This should always be [log(10)/log(2)] using any base of logrithm.)
Women
Class World Record A
45 191

0.00002645886266
49 203

0.00002161046356
55 221

0.00001629661631
59 232

0.00001386816515
64 245

0.00001157076467
71 261

0.00000937764965
76 272

0.000008175929892
81 283

0.000007167071831
87 294

0.000006314335523
+87 320

0.000004765098749
b = 3.3219281 (This should always be [log(10)/log(2)] using any base of logrithm.)
Men
Class World Record A
55 293

0.000006386209266
61 312

0.000005183197783
67 331

0.000004259048574
73 348

0.000003606255594
81 368

0.000002995284257
89 387

0.0000025340212
96 401

0.000002251860969
102 412

0.000002058256392
109 424

0.000001871024806
+109 453

0.000001501871444

July 2, 2014

“Fight” Featuring Weightlifters — Including Masters

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — Michael @ 12:25

I found this video moving … and envy the speed of the old guy’s movements.

November 24, 2013

Python and Numato

I am working on a project to use Python programming and Numato input/output devices to build a weightlifting referee-light system. I will try to keep track of problems I run into (and solutions I find) as I go along.
All related posts will be in the “pythonnumato” category.




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